Just Jennica

tardisbro:

iamnotover:

hungoverandhard-up:

robynjaja:

This is one of the most adorable comics I’ve ever read

I’ve been waiting for this to pop back up on my dashboard.. we are way too hard on ourselves.

YES, EVERYONE!! Read this! You’re wonderful!

This is exactly what I needed today

jessicaaday:

If true love is blind, maybe you won’t mind the view?

ben-c:

bonaventure-:

if someone ever calls u a mean name just respond “nah” like how do you even respond to that realistically 

some person: hey asstown 
you: nah 
some person:

i think my favourite part about this post is that out of all the mean names someone could realistically call you, they chose “asstown”

dreaming-sleeping-fallen-angel:

polyglotplatypus:

vivalacastiel:

polyglotplatypus:

NoNOGO TO YOUR ROOM AND THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU’VE DONE


make me

YOU ARE A MONSTER
*manly tears*

dreaming-sleeping-fallen-angel:

polyglotplatypus:

vivalacastiel:

polyglotplatypus:

No
NO

GO TO YOUR ROOM AND THINK ABOUT WHAT YOU’VE DONE

photo-10

make me

YOU ARE A MONSTER

*manly tears*

image

ray-winters-sings:

margorothspiegelmanthegreat:

ray-winters-sings:

You never know how much they say “Wildcats” in High School Musical til you have to drink everytime they do.

I’m reblogging this not because they say Wildcats a lot but because we’re acting on the assumption that people who are old enough to drink sit around playing drinking games to HSM and that’s beautiful. 

Currently

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

roommate requirements

  • willing to reenact the ‘where’s my supersuit’ scene from the incredibles with me at any point in time
shychemist:

notanursejustplayoneontv:

ikaricrossinglines:

casey-lawrence:

skatediamond13:

ask-liza:

annie-croft:

whimmy-bam:

sirileigh:

prllnce:

meggchan:

Mine is mostly cognitive.

I have all three. Well oops.

Dammit! So do I!

No one has said this yet, so I feel I must.
THANK YOU FOR THIS.
So many people don’t seem to understand that social anxiety can manifest itself in multiple ways. Some people will just dismiss that you have social anxiety if you don’t fit into what they perceive it to be, and that lack of understanding can be really hurtful. So thank you for this.
(And as my personal comment, I fit into behavioural and cognitive.)

I have cognitive :(

[- Cognitive and Behavioural :S -]

all…

#I’m just curious why they made it into the Chrome logo…

I feel like I just won the “cognitive bingo…”

All but mostly behavioral and physical


Mine is mostly cognitive and behavioural (avoidance behaviours and perceptions of negative thoughts/being judged). I get a bit of the physical symptoms, but not most of them.

shychemist:

notanursejustplayoneontv:

ikaricrossinglines:

casey-lawrence:

skatediamond13:

ask-liza:

annie-croft:

whimmy-bam:

sirileigh:

prllnce:

meggchan:

Mine is mostly cognitive.

I have all three. Well oops.

Dammit! So do I!

No one has said this yet, so I feel I must.

THANK YOU FOR THIS.

So many people don’t seem to understand that social anxiety can manifest itself in multiple ways. Some people will just dismiss that you have social anxiety if you don’t fit into what they perceive it to be, and that lack of understanding can be really hurtful. So thank you for this.

(And as my personal comment, I fit into behavioural and cognitive.)

I have cognitive :(

[- Cognitive and Behavioural :S -]

all…

I feel like I just won the “cognitive bingo…”

All but mostly behavioral and physical

Mine is mostly cognitive and behavioural (avoidance behaviours and perceptions of negative thoughts/being judged). I get a bit of the physical symptoms, but not most of them.

just-another-dream:

The best part is he gets slowly more annoyed

guiltyhipster:

Shout out to Ellie’s relative who fires a gun in church